Book Clubs

Interested in joining a book club? The Decatur Public Library offers different book clubs and you can drop in any time! You do not have to the read the book to attend discussions, but you will want to.

 

 

 

Books Between Bites

BBB is organized by the Friends of the Decatur Public Library and is not a standard book club. There is a speaker that comes in to present about a book or topic. They meet the first Wednesday of each month at 12:15pm in the Madden Auditorium.

Wednesday, February 6, 12:15pm, Madden Auditorium
Speaker: Mark Sorensen
Book: Becoming Lincoln
Author: William W. Freehling

This 2018 Lincoln interpretation was nominated for Illinois Historical Society Book of the Year.  Bancroft Award-winning author Freehling explains how Lincoln learned from his many personal and political mistakes and misfortunes to recover from a difficult early life and repeated defeats in order to obtain the highest office in the land and save the Union.

Mark Sorensen is former director of the Illinois State Archives, author of  many articles about state and local history, and President of Decatur Public Library Board of Trustees.


DPL Graphic Novel Club

The Club meets the second Tuesday of each month at 6:30pm in the Staley room. This club reads a variety of Graphic Novels written primarily for adults.

Due to Decatur Public Library’s observance of Lincoln’s Birthday on February 12
– DPL closes at 5:30pm – the Graphic Novel Club will meet on:
Tuesday, February 19, 6:30pm, VTEL Room
Sleeper, Season 1 & 2
by Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips

SLEEPER is the critically acclaimed graphic novel series written Ed Brubaker and illustrated by Sean Philips, the Eisner Award-winning creative team of Criminal, which tells the story of agent Holden Carver, a reluctant double agent without hope of rescue. Tao–the criminal mastermind whose organization Carver has infultraited–had Carver’s only lifeline, spymaster John Lynch shot, leaving him in a coma. Tao’s cut off every means of escape, and he’s persuaded Carver to join him…for real this time. From Amazon.


DPL Poetry Book Club

The Club meets the third Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm in the board room. This club reads a mixture of fiction and non-fiction. This group is facilitated by Dr. Ngozi Onuora, Associate Professor, Millikin University

Wednesday, February 20, 6:30pm, Board Room
Indecency

by Justin Phillip Reed

Indecency is boldly and carefully executed and perfectly ragged. In these poems, Justin Phillip Reed experiments with language to explore inequity and injustice and to critique and lament the culture of white supremacy and the dominant social order. Political and personal, tender, daring, and insightful―the author unpacks his intimacies, weaponizing poetry to take on masculinity, sexuality, exploitation, and the prison industrial complex and unmask all the failures of the structures into which society sorts us. From Amazon.


DPL Book Club

The Club meets the third Thursday of each month at 1:00pm in the board room. This club reads a mixture of fiction and non-fiction.

Thursday, February 21, 1:00pm, Board Room
Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine
by Gail Honeyman

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy.

But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.

Soon to be a major motion picture produced by Reese Witherspoon, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine is the smart, warm, and uplifting story of an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose deadpan weirdness and unconscious wit make for an irresistible journey as she realizes. . .

The only way to survive is to open your heart. From Amazon.


DPL Non-Fiction Book Club

The Club meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:00pm in the board room. This club reads non-fiction only.

Tuesday, January 22, 1:00pm, Board Room
Magic Bean: The Rise of Soy in America
by Matthew Roth

At the turn of the twentieth century, soybeans grew on so little of America’s land that nobody bothered to track the total. By the year 2000, they covered upward of 70 million acres, second only to corn, and had become the nation’s largest cash crop. How this little-known Chinese transplant, initially grown chiefly for forage, turned into a ubiquitous component of American farming, culture, and cuisine is the story Matthew Roth tells in Magic Bean: The Rise of Soy in America.

The soybean’s journey from one continent into the heart of another was by no means assured or predictable. In Asia, the soybean had been bred and cultivated into a nutritious staple food over the course of centuries. Its adoption by Americans was long in coming—the outcome of migration and innovation, changing tastes and habits, and the transformation of food, farming, breeding, marketing, and indeed the bean itself, during the twentieth century. All come in for scrutiny as Roth traces the ups and downs of the soybean’s journey. Along the way, he uncovers surprising developments, including a series of catastrophic explosions at soy-processing plants in the 1930s, the widespread production of tofu in Japanese-American internment camps during World War II, the decades-long project to improve the blandness of soybean oil, the creation of new southern soybean varieties named after Confederate generals, the role of the San Francisco Bay Area counterculture in popularizing soy foods, and the discovery of soy phytoestrogens in the late 1980s. We also encounter fascinating figures in their own right, such as Yamei Kin, the Chinese American who promoted tofu during World War I, and African American chemist Percy Lavon Julian, who played a critical role in the story of synthetic human hormones derived from soy sterols.

A thoroughly engaging work of narrative history, Magic Bean: The Rise of Soy in America is the first comprehensive account of the soybean in America over the entire course of the twentieth century. From Amazon.

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